Game of Thrones: Honey Biscuits from The South

Game of Thrones: Honey BiscuitsHonestly, I haven’t gotten a chance to watch this week’s episode of “Game of Thrones” yet (thank goodness for HBO Go!) – so no spoilers please!  But one thing that is sure not to spoil are these delicious Honey Biscuits from A Feast of Ice and Fire.  They’re featured in the cookbook’s section on “The South,” which also includes tasty-sounding delicacies like “Stewed Rabbit,” “Arya’s Snitched Tarts,” and “Sister’s Stew.”  The Honey Biscuits originally appeared in A Clash of Kings, the second book in the series “A Song of Ice and Fire”:

“For the sweet, Lord Caswell’s servants brought down trays of pastries from his castle kitchens, cream swans and spun-sugar unicorns, lemon cakes in the shape of roses, spiced honey biscuits and blackberry tarts, apple crisps and wheels of buttery cheese.” ~ A Clash of Kings

Like many of the other recipes in the cookbook, authors Chelsea Monroe-Cassel and Sariann Lehrer included both a “medieval” version and a “modern” version.  I went with the medieval version, whose original 14th century recipe goes like this:

“Crispels.  Take and make a foile of gode past as thynne as paper; kerue it out wyt a saucer & frye it in oile; oper in grece; and be remnaunt, take hony clarified and flamme perwith.  Alye hem vp and serue hem forth.”

Got that?  Me neither.  Essentially these medieval honey biscuits are made from a simple pastry dough that’s been rolled out flat, cut into biscuit-size circles, and lightly fried in oil, then brushed with warm honey and dusted with cinnamon.  Mmmmmmm.

Brent and I enjoyed these sweet treats alongside a bowl of Hungarian Venison Stew, rice, and Southern-style collard greens, and they easily stole the dinner show.

Check back next Monday for another recipe from A Feast of Ice and Fire!

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